About your Search

20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
. dan came in here in 2006 after being gone for many, many years to challenge jim walsh. >> moderator: okay, do you want to come in now? >> what's the question? >> moderator: you have not been the subject of the attack ads, but you have a positive message you want out. you have a 60 seconds on an issue of your choosing. >> thank you. i'm a central new york stative born and raised in syracuse, my parents from poland in the 1980s, they came here basically believing that this is the kind of country where you work hard, you can create a good life for your family, and that's not the case anymore. the american dream is far out of reach of too many people so what i support is the green new deal, public investment to put people back to work meeting today's challenges. that means addressing unmet community needs whether it's updating our hundred-year-old sewers in syracuse, developing energy for real energy independence. it support these policies to put, you know, the communities and put money in working people's pockets. i think we need new leadership. i said it before. my opponents represent
they think it all ties back to that. a next session, please come out jim doherty, a very good long-time friend of mine who is a fellow at the council on foreign relations is going to moderate. but organize this in conjunction with the council on foreign relations as about u.s. competitiveness. let's get it underway, the panel is fair. all right, jim, take it away. >> great to be here in detroit. first time in a while. i have to make it happen more often. so were going to have a nice conversation. we have to cover a lot of a lot of things in 40 minutes, so we're going to start right away. you can see the panelists, backgrounds, michael, paul and ted, great panel. i'm 40 minutes that we try to cover as looking at infrastructure, education and immigration, trying to look at it through the lens of technology and the role of urban centers and take a look at what the current state is in the united states in each of these things, what some of our best as competitors are doing and maybe a couple sections on tactical things the united states can you do have a job. we'll try to take the call
think jim was also talking about. we need to make sure for those minimal protections are in place to okay, so the goal is a stronger defense for critical infrastructure. what else should we be doing? >> i think getting the companies to have a common level of knowledge, a vulnerability and potential response. here is a simple question that people could ask themselves. am i running windows 98? windows 98 is totally unsecure. so that is a lot of good examples of no-brainer questions. also, do i have automatic updates turned on. yes or no. if you don't have it turned out, you're going to have a problem. are you doing patches? do you know how many wireless devices connect to your network? do have some way to control when you plug in a thumb drive or some other device? this is not, in some ways, but the basic level you could take that would reduce a lot of this. it is not rocket science. you need a password management program. do you accept collect calls from russia? [laughter] >> because that happens. this is a good example. this is like the classic cyberstory. springfield water supply
some tweaks. this is jim. because the probability of loss is so high, private insurers won't underwrite. larry says it is silly to say the private insurance companies aren't capable of offering flood insurance. you can ensure anything for a price. eric says government insurance is in direct competition with u.s. businesses. government has no business being in the spirit >> host: the tweet is that the private insurance market can ensure anything given the right price, i think that's accurate. the private market can certainly insure something. it just depends upon the price. i suspect the private market back in the 1960s decided they needed to charge exceptionally high prices because the risk of flooding was really, really high and the prices they needed to charge were so high that they would price the consumers out of purchasing the program. and so, i mention this earlier, but there is a fine line of charging the right price, but yet not pricing yourself out of the consumer market. the flood risk unfortunately, you mentioned the storms and all of them being since 2000. you know, the list
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4